Children: Foster | Adopt

Children: Foster | Adopt

Brochure: Foster | Adopt Shelby County Ohio (Click here)

Shelby County Department of Job and Family Services

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Statistics from: OHIO’S CHILDREN 2017 Ohio’s Children at a Glance1

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

In 2015, Ohio had 172,445 total referrals for child abuse and neglect. Of those, 79,215 reports were referred for investigation.

In 2015, there were 23,006 victims of abuse or neglect in Ohio, a rate of 8.8 per 1,000 children, a decrease 7.7% from 2014. Of these children, 44.0% were neglected, 44.3% were physically abused, and 20.4% were sexually abused. The number of child victims has decreased 24.8% in comparison to the number of victims in 2011.

In 2015, there were 74 child deaths resulting from abuse or neglect reported in Ohio, 13,205 children in Ohio lived apart from their families in out-of-home care in 2015, compared with 12,069 children in 2011. Of the children living apart from their families in 2014, there were 4,917 aged 5 or younger, and 2,042 were 16 or older.

The number of children living apart from their families in out-of-home care has increased 9.4% in comparison to the number of children in out-of-home care in 2011.

In 2015, of children in out-of-home care in Ohio, 56% were white, 30% were black, 5% were Hispanic, < .5% were American Indian/Alaskan Native, < .5% were Asian or Pacific Islander and 9-10% were of more than one race or ethnicity/undetermined race or ethnicity.

ADOPTION, KINSHIP CARE, AND PERMANENT FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN

Of the 9,340 children exiting out-of-home care in 2014 in Ohio, 44% were reunited with their parents or primary caretakers.

1,334 children were legally adopted through a public child welfare agency in Ohio in 2015, a decrease of 5.1% from 1,406 in 2014.

Of the 13,205 children in out-of-home care in 2015, there were 3,010 or 22.8% waiting to be adopted.

In 2015, approximately 93,394 grandparents in Ohio had the primary responsibility of caring for their grandchildren.

 2,055 of the children in out-of-home care in 2014 were living with relatives while in care.

CHILD POVERTY AND INCOME SUPPORT.  

The monthly average number of individuals receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in Ohio decreased from 113,806 in 2015 to 107,761 in 2016, a 5.6% change. There was a 57,644 monthly average of families received TANF in 2016, a decrease of 4.2% from2015.20 

In Ohio in 2015, 1,101,000 children lived below 200% of poverty.

$1,006,846,659 was spent in 2015 on TANF assistance in Ohio, including 25.1% on basic assistance, 35.0% on child care, 1.6% on transportation, and 0.0% on nonassistance.

$101,852,969 was spent in 2015 on WIC (the Special Supplement Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) in Ohio, serving 244,201 participants.

In 2014, Ohio distributed $1,680,821,856 in child support funds, a decrease of 1.4% from 2013.

760,000 children in Ohio lived in households with a high housing burden in 2014, where more than 30% of monthly income is spent on housing costs. 

In December of 2016, the unemployment rate in Ohio was 4.9.

16.9% of households in Ohio were food insecure on average from 2012 to 2014, meaning that the family experienced difficulty providing enough food due to lack of resources at some point during the year.

CHILD CARE AND HEAD START

In 2015, Ohio had a monthly average of 47,200 children served by subsidized child care. An average of 45,600 children received subsidized child care per month in 2014 and 48,500 were recepients in 2013.

In 2016, to be eligible for subsidized child care in Ohio, a family of three could make no more than $26,124 at application, which is equivalent to 40% of the state’s median income. 

As of early 2016, Ohio had no children on its waiting list for child care assistance. 

In 2015, Head Start served 37,128 children in Ohio, a decrease of 5.8% from2014. 

Through federal grants from the Home Visiting Program, in fiscal year 2015, home visitors in Ohio made 15,512 home visits to 3,515 parents and children in 1,633 families, as well as enrolled 1,452 new parents and children to the program.